Solidago odora Sweet Goldenrod 1gallon

$8.00

Solidago odora (Sweet Goldenrod) 4ft; anise scented leaves; late summer early fall bloomer; full sun/partial shade.  Blooms attract bees, butterflies and many other insects. Goldenrods are among the most important late-season pollinator plants. Honey bees feast on goldenrod nectar before winter. Butterflies and many other pollinators rely on goldenrods as a major food source. Beekeepers often use goldenrods as the primary food source for winter.  Some sources report that goldenrod nectar has an average sugar concentration of 33%.

Zone 4-9

1gallon available

Full Description

Solidago odora (Sweet Goldenrod) 4ft; anise scented leaves; late summer early fall bloomer; full sun/partial shade.  Blooms attract bees, butterflies and many other insects. Goldenrods are among the most important late-season pollinator plants. Honey bees feast on goldenrod nectar before winter. Butterflies and many other pollinators rely on goldenrods as a major food source. Beekeepers often use goldenrods as the primary food source for winter.  Some sources report that goldenrod nectar has an average sugar concentration of 33%.

Zone 4-9

1gallon available

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Solidago odora

There's so much good that can be said about this native goldenrod. Not only does it provide one of the most extended bloom times for the species, it also blooms earlier than most. It's foliage is deep green with thin leaves resembling peach leaves, but prettier. In addition, the foliage, when crushed, smells wonderfully like anise. It can be grown in clay , sand or good garden soil and it performs best in full sun. It also eats drought up for lunch! It's easily the most well behaved GR that I've ever grown, and I grew at least 10 different species. The first 7 I purchased from MON were very nice. I plan to add at least a dozen more this Fall. If you're looking for a well behaved late summer bloomer that attracts pollinators, look no further than Solidago odora.